A study to be published in the Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition (available now as an OnlineEarly article) “demonstrate[s] the importance of gonadal oestrogen for the control of food intake in male and female cats.” The study, which tested whether estradiol and genistein would control body fat in neutered cats, found estradiol “almost completely prevented” increases in food intake, weight, and body fat after the subject cats were neutered. Treatment with genistein led to a significant increase in lean body mass and had a slightly lower effect on body fat than did estradiol but did not affect food intake. The authors suggest that supplemental estrogen might be an important component in battling the growing problem of obesity among neutered cats.

A complete list of the Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition articles now available through the OnlineEarly program can be found here.