The arrival of a new baby in the house has made it a bit more difficult for catmanager to keep up with the steady stream of new journal issues. I’d love to be providing my usual summaries of articles I find notable, but time (or the lack of it) leaves me no choice but to cut back somewhat.

The following veterinary journals have new issues available online:

    Also now available online are the following individual articles (half are from forthcoming issues of veterinary journals; half are from journals that are not veterinary-specific):

    • An article on feline leishmaniasis appears in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 76, No. 4 (2007).
    • A study accepted for publication in the Journal of Applied Physiology (available online now) finds that ” the role of the vestibular system in the control of breathing is to modify baseline respiratory parameters in proportion to the general intensity of ongoing movements, and not to rapidly alter ventilation in accordance with body position.”
    • A study forthcoming in the Journal of Microbiology (available as an OnlineEarly Article now) “demonstrate[s] that rumen fungi can biohydrogenate fatty acids.”
    • A study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 104, no. 15 (April 10, 2007) finds that Toxoplasma causes highly specific changes in the brains of rats (previous studies have shown brain changes but not such specifically targeted changes as this study claims).
    • A study forthcoming in Animal Genetics (available as an OnlineEarly Article now) finds that as in mice and dogs mutations in the fibroblast growth factor 5 (FGF5) gene are responsible for differing hair length in cats.
    • A paper forthcoming in the Journal of Small Animal Practice (available as an OnlineEarly Article now) reports on a case of canine sinus arrest caused by atrial myocarditits.
    • A study forthcoming in the Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics (available as an OnlineEarly Article now) looks at the use of morphine in dogs.
    • A study forthcoming in Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia (available as an OnlineEarly Article now) compares “two anaesthetic protocols using lidocaine or medetomidine in horses.”
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